Handpoke Online Course

4. Body Parts

6 thoughts on “HOC – 4 Body Parts”

  1. Hi Ann!

    First of all, I just want to say thank you SO MUCH for this course! I’ve been handpoking for about a year now, and this course has provided a wealth of knowledge that’s really going to increase the quality of my work. It’s been invaluable to me, and I can’t thank you enough!

    On topic, do you have much experience with tattooing ears or the head in general? I’ve had several requests for ear tattoos, but I’ve declined due to my inexperience – I’m worried about blowout, especially on ear skin considering how thin it seems to be there. Is there any advice or insight you could offer in this regard? My wife has kindly offered to be my first client, but I’ll be apprehensive until I’ve heard an experienced professional’s opinion on the matter.

    Thanks from Canada!

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, James!

      I did a lot of ear and face tattoos in my career, i think because handpoke is much more comfortable for the clients in these areas. So far I never had any problems or blowouts.
      The skin itself is actually very easy to tattoo and super good for handpoking. I never had any blowouts there.
      But I am also always especially careful in these areas naturally, simply because of their visibility. I don’t think I ever tried to push my luck. If you do so too I am sure you will be fine ; )
      The most difficult part is positioning your hands. That is a little bit annoying but thats just how it is.

  2. Hello Ann! I’ve seriously binge watch the whole course! It is so well explained that I could’t stop! Although I’ll probably need to go back to fully interiorize everything, but I have learned so much so far! So thank you for making it happened! I can definitely see all the hard work and passion that has gone into it! 🙂

    For now I have a couple of question regarding blow outs/patchy lines.
    – Is there anything you reckon that can be done to correct or “hide” a blow out? (someone suggested going over the blueish part with white, but haven’t tried it myself). In my experience this has only happened once when tattooing in the inner arm; but I am scared of it happening again and would like to know if there is anything that can be done to correct it.
    – Also, a couple of times that I have tattooed skin in the inner arm and closer to the wrist, the lines have gotten patchy after healing. It just seems that the line between to much and too little in this areas is so thin -.-‘ Do you have any tips for this? and also, how long do you think is advisable to wait for the tattoo to heal before going over the lines again?

    Thank you so much for your time and your knowledge! <3

    1. Hey María 🙂

      Thank you <3 and yes, there is something you can do about the blowouts. I have been testing a little with covering blowouts lately. I will also make a full post with examples about it on my IG when I am ready 🙂 Don't use white to cover the blowouts, it might sill make for some improvement but I personally think that it looks way too smudged after healing. I would recomment using the skincolor of this person to cover it. I only tested it on myself so far and I am very white but I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work on all skin colors. For myself I used "Fusion INK - Nikko Hurtado - Bone" so I didn't even have to mix the color myself. It worked fine but I still think you should only use this technique for the rims of the tattoo. I don't think covering big areas will look good 😉

      If you want to make corrections on a tattoo: If it is blowouts that you want to try to cover I would wait 2-3 month to make sure that is is really fully healed, also on the inside. If you want to touch up a tattoo you don't have to wait that long. When the tattoo was handpoked 3-4 Weeks should be enough.

      And about the body parts that you were mentioning..the problems you had with them is exactly what makes them so difficult to tattoo. On the wrist: Don't tattoo into the wrinkles on the inside, just leave out a tiny spot there if you don't feel confident enough or just place the tattoo a little higher, the skin in the wrinkles is even thinner. If it's the inside of the upper arm: Just stretch the skin as much as you can, be very careful and hope for the best. I personally always talk my clients out of getting the tattoo there 😀 There is no body part I hate more 😉

  3. Hi, Ann! this course has been wonderful, thank you so much for doing it, especially with such an affordable price.
    I wanted to know a little bit more about what areas of the skin are not suitable for tattooing. Are stretch marks and scars ok to tattoo? Also, I have seen tattooers worry about not tattooing on moles and others not caring about it. What is your experience with these and other parts of the body that should not be tattooed?

    1. Hey Sandra 🙂

      Molds should not be tattooed mainly because a dermatologist should always be able to check them. Also they tend to bleed like hell if you accidentally poke into them.
      So if you have a mole in the area you want to tattoo you have to leave out the mole. (Just tattoo around it) And leave a little bit of space.
      Scarred tissue (including stretchmarks) is definately tattooable but it is harder to work with than undamaged skin. In some cases the scrarred skin does not take the ink well and you have to touch it up.. some tend more to create blowouts. It depends a lot on how deep the scar goes and it’s structure. I personally am not specialized in scar covering, so I could not give you a detailed guide about tattooing scars. Heavy scars should always be tattooed by a specialist. Little scars and stretchmarks that are obviously not that heavy should not be a big problem but tell your clinent about the risk and your experience level. Be a little extra careful and obseve the skin very well. A scar should also always be completely healed before tattooing over it ( meaning there should be no redness left at all)
      <3

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6 thoughts on “HOC – 4 Body Parts”

  1. Hi Ann!

    First of all, I just want to say thank you SO MUCH for this course! I’ve been handpoking for about a year now, and this course has provided a wealth of knowledge that’s really going to increase the quality of my work. It’s been invaluable to me, and I can’t thank you enough!

    On topic, do you have much experience with tattooing ears or the head in general? I’ve had several requests for ear tattoos, but I’ve declined due to my inexperience – I’m worried about blowout, especially on ear skin considering how thin it seems to be there. Is there any advice or insight you could offer in this regard? My wife has kindly offered to be my first client, but I’ll be apprehensive until I’ve heard an experienced professional’s opinion on the matter.

    Thanks from Canada!

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, James!

      I did a lot of ear and face tattoos in my career, i think because handpoke is much more comfortable for the clients in these areas. So far I never had any problems or blowouts.
      The skin itself is actually very easy to tattoo and super good for handpoking. I never had any blowouts there.
      But I am also always especially careful in these areas naturally, simply because of their visibility. I don’t think I ever tried to push my luck. If you do so too I am sure you will be fine ; )
      The most difficult part is positioning your hands. That is a little bit annoying but thats just how it is.

  2. Hello Ann! I’ve seriously binge watch the whole course! It is so well explained that I could’t stop! Although I’ll probably need to go back to fully interiorize everything, but I have learned so much so far! So thank you for making it happened! I can definitely see all the hard work and passion that has gone into it! 🙂

    For now I have a couple of question regarding blow outs/patchy lines.
    – Is there anything you reckon that can be done to correct or “hide” a blow out? (someone suggested going over the blueish part with white, but haven’t tried it myself). In my experience this has only happened once when tattooing in the inner arm; but I am scared of it happening again and would like to know if there is anything that can be done to correct it.
    – Also, a couple of times that I have tattooed skin in the inner arm and closer to the wrist, the lines have gotten patchy after healing. It just seems that the line between to much and too little in this areas is so thin -.-‘ Do you have any tips for this? and also, how long do you think is advisable to wait for the tattoo to heal before going over the lines again?

    Thank you so much for your time and your knowledge! <3

    1. Hey María 🙂

      Thank you <3 and yes, there is something you can do about the blowouts. I have been testing a little with covering blowouts lately. I will also make a full post with examples about it on my IG when I am ready 🙂 Don't use white to cover the blowouts, it might sill make for some improvement but I personally think that it looks way too smudged after healing. I would recomment using the skincolor of this person to cover it. I only tested it on myself so far and I am very white but I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work on all skin colors. For myself I used "Fusion INK - Nikko Hurtado - Bone" so I didn't even have to mix the color myself. It worked fine but I still think you should only use this technique for the rims of the tattoo. I don't think covering big areas will look good 😉

      If you want to make corrections on a tattoo: If it is blowouts that you want to try to cover I would wait 2-3 month to make sure that is is really fully healed, also on the inside. If you want to touch up a tattoo you don't have to wait that long. When the tattoo was handpoked 3-4 Weeks should be enough.

      And about the body parts that you were mentioning..the problems you had with them is exactly what makes them so difficult to tattoo. On the wrist: Don't tattoo into the wrinkles on the inside, just leave out a tiny spot there if you don't feel confident enough or just place the tattoo a little higher, the skin in the wrinkles is even thinner. If it's the inside of the upper arm: Just stretch the skin as much as you can, be very careful and hope for the best. I personally always talk my clients out of getting the tattoo there 😀 There is no body part I hate more 😉

  3. Hi, Ann! this course has been wonderful, thank you so much for doing it, especially with such an affordable price.
    I wanted to know a little bit more about what areas of the skin are not suitable for tattooing. Are stretch marks and scars ok to tattoo? Also, I have seen tattooers worry about not tattooing on moles and others not caring about it. What is your experience with these and other parts of the body that should not be tattooed?

    1. Hey Sandra 🙂

      Molds should not be tattooed mainly because a dermatologist should always be able to check them. Also they tend to bleed like hell if you accidentally poke into them.
      So if you have a mole in the area you want to tattoo you have to leave out the mole. (Just tattoo around it) And leave a little bit of space.
      Scarred tissue (including stretchmarks) is definately tattooable but it is harder to work with than undamaged skin. In some cases the scrarred skin does not take the ink well and you have to touch it up.. some tend more to create blowouts. It depends a lot on how deep the scar goes and it’s structure. I personally am not specialized in scar covering, so I could not give you a detailed guide about tattooing scars. Heavy scars should always be tattooed by a specialist. Little scars and stretchmarks that are obviously not that heavy should not be a big problem but tell your clinent about the risk and your experience level. Be a little extra careful and obseve the skin very well. A scar should also always be completely healed before tattooing over it ( meaning there should be no redness left at all)
      <3

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